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‘Under the scope’: an interview with Ann Wheeler

Posted by , on 8 September 2020

Ann Wheeler received her PhD from University College London as part of a molecular cell biology 4-year rotation programme where she got to use confocal imaging quite extensively. She then moved to Columbia University to do some total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. She was actually one of the first people to use TIRF as

LSFM series – Surfing on the data freak wave! PART I: Knowing your turf, knowing your surf!

Posted by , on 5 September 2020

Here we present a series of five blog posts with tips and tricks about light sheet microscopy. 1. The basics of LSFM (Sept 2020) 2. Improving sample mounting (Oct 2020) 3. Calibration and Acquisition (Nov 2020) 4. Tailoring the data (Dec 2020) 5. What is next? AI and smarter than us LSFM (Jan 2021)

A new bioimaging technical talk series - your opinions please!

Posted by , on 18 August 2020

The RMS and BioImagingUK would like to organise a new series of short talks on the practical side of bioimaging techniques. One of the few upsides of the pandemic has been the availability of excellent talks online, however few have focused on the hands on work of running imaging experiments. Therefore we think this series

SRRF-Stream+ Super-Resolution Microscopy Accessible to All

Sponsored by Andor, on 12 August 2020

Fast, reliable & live-cell compatible Super-Resolution Science has limits imposed by the laws of physics that constrain discoveries and the advance of knowledge. In microscopy, up until the beginning of the XXI century, the diffraction limit of light was an unbreakable barrier. This law of physics imposes that two points could not be resolved (clearly

How To Train an Undergraduate Researcher in The Age of COVID-19

Posted by , on 10 August 2020

The year 2020 has been challenging for researchers around the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With limited access to our labs, it is not easy to gain hands-on bench experience. We are the undergraduate researchers in the Rodal Lab, from Brandeis University in Waltham, MA. Our lab primarily studies membrane trafficking events at the

Science and Art – the not so odd couple?

Posted by , on 31 July 2020

At a first, superficial glance, you could be forgiven for placing scientists and artists at the opposite ends of the career spectrum. Scientists need to be accurate and methodical. They must generate highly reproducible data while adhering to strict regulations. On the other hand, artists are often stereotyped as disorganized, free spirits, ungoverned by rules,

Expansion microscopy

Posted by , on 29 July 2020

Written by Shoh Asano and Ruixuan Gao Light microscopy and diffraction limit For centuries, light microscopy has played a central role in biological studies. The first implementations of a light microscope dates back to as early as the late 16th and early 17th century, when an array of polished lenses was used to magnify (biological)

“openFrame” for modular, extensible, easily maintained, open-source microscopy

Posted by , on 23 July 2020

The openFrame [1] is an open-source microscopy hardware project initiated by the Photonics Group in the Physics Department at Imperial College London that is intended to provide access to a modular, upgradable, easily maintained and modifiable microscope frame that can be implemented at relatively low cost compared to existing commercial instruments. openFrame is a component

Electron microscopy: from the dark ages to a bright future

Posted by , on 21 July 2020

Good sample preparation is, as every microscopist knows, the key to delivering sound results from an imaging experiment. In the digital age, and with the advent of big data, image analysis is also critical to extract meaningful quantitative results from image data. Indeed nowadays, the microscope itself is often the most well-developed and user-friendly part

Take this quick X-Ray Microscopy Usage Survey!

Posted by , on 17 July 2020

Take part in online poll to gauge use of technique and identify opportunities to expand its application The use of X-ray microscopy techniques is well established in many scientific and engineering disciplines but not all have “seen the light”. The X-ray Microscopy Focussed Interest Group (X-ray FIG) of the Royal Microscopical Society (RMS) would like