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Displaying posts in the category: Tools

Turn Your Inverted Microscope into a Multimodal Nanoscope

Sponsored by Olympus, on 14 June 2021

Among recent nanoscopy techniques that break the diffraction limit, single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) contributes to major discoveries in medicine and biology. It is now possible to see how subcellular molecular machineries form and behave inside single cells and to quantify single biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids, at ultralow concentrations inside the

What is Expansion Microscopy?

Sponsored by Andor, on 27 May 2021

How can you get the most information from expanded samples? Traditional light microscopy is limited by the diffraction of light, consequently, features less than 200 nm apart cannot be resolved. For a significant time microscopy technique development was focused towards improving imaging techniques to allow for individual molecules to be resolved. Super-resolution microscopy was developed

Compact and High Performance Fluorescence Microscopy

Sponsored by Etaluma, on 28 April 2021

“Disruptive technologies typically enable new markets to emerge… disruptive products are simpler and cheaper;” Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma Microscopes are the most common laboratory instrument in the world; there are more labs with a microscope in them than any other instrument.  As such, it is a field where innovation is constantly producing new

Part V The future: The hope of smart microscopes and phantoms

Posted by , on 24 April 2021

Elisabeth Kugler 1 and Emmanuel G. Reynaud 2 Contact: kugler.elisabeth@gmail.com; emmanuel.reynaud@ucd.ie We are reaching the end of our LSFM journey. Now it is time to look into the future, riding the plane of light! So, what is next for the LSFM? 1. Four-to-two, then four, then one. The story of SPIM, and LSFM per se,

Technology highlights - Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI)

Posted by , on 20 January 2021

Interview with Helena Chmelová, Ph.D. from the Light Microscopy Core facility at the Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, Czech Republic. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself – where you work, what your research focus is? I work at the Light Microscopy Core Facility at the Institute of

Technology highlights - Traction Force Microscopy (TFM)

Posted by , on 9 December 2020

Interview with Aki Stubb, Ph.D. Please tell us a bit about yourself and the facility where you work. My name is Aki Stubb and I am a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK. I did my PhD in the group of Johanna Ivaska at the Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo

SRRF-Stream+ Super-Resolution Microscopy Accessible to All

Sponsored by Andor, on 12 August 2020

Fast, reliable & live-cell compatible Super-Resolution Science has limits imposed by the laws of physics that constrain discoveries and the advance of knowledge. In microscopy, up until the beginning of the XXI century, the diffraction limit of light was an unbreakable barrier. This law of physics imposes that two points could not be resolved (clearly

Expansion microscopy

Posted by , on 29 July 2020

Written by Shoh Asano and Ruixuan Gao Light microscopy and diffraction limit For centuries, light microscopy has played a central role in biological studies. The first implementations of a light microscope dates back to as early as the late 16th and early 17th century, when an array of polished lenses was used to magnify (biological)

“openFrame” for modular, extensible, easily maintained, open-source microscopy

Posted by , on 23 July 2020

The openFrame [1] is an open-source microscopy hardware project initiated by the Photonics Group in the Physics Department at Imperial College London that is intended to provide access to a modular, upgradable, easily maintained and modifiable microscope frame that can be implemented at relatively low cost compared to existing commercial instruments. openFrame is a component

How CLIJ2 can make your bio-image analysis workflows incredibly fast

Posted by , on 14 July 2020

Do you also spend a substantial amount of your time waiting for automated image analysis to finish? I did, again and again for more than a decade. And, then,  the morning after running a script overnight, you realize that a parameter was wrongly set. It was about time to change that. History Processing on graphics