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Displaying posts in the category: Discussions

Microscopy Open Access collection 2020

Posted by , on 19 October 2020

Here on FocalPlane, Open Access Week is especially close to our hearts as it coincides with the birthday of the father of microscopy, Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (24 October). So every year for Open Access Week, we will be listing all the microscopy-related Open Access articles from The Company of Biologists journals on FocalPlane under the

LSFM series – Surfing on the data freak wave! Part II: Before imaging: Know your sample (geometry)

Posted by , on 10 October 2020

This post, part of the blog series "LSFM series – Surfing on the data freak wave!", discusses (a) Sample preparation, (b) Light interaction with matter, (c) sample alignment and (d) checking fluorescence and calibration

Bioimage Analysis in FIJI - Resource List

Posted by , on 14 September 2020

If you are on this site, you might be aware of some of the open source image processing and analysis tools are available to you. The toolbox in this space is rapidly expanding. But that doesn’t always mean it’s easy to navigate – it can actually be quite daunting. Luckily the bio-imaging community is friendly

LSFM series – Surfing on the data freak wave! PART I: Knowing your turf, knowing your surf!

Posted by , on 5 September 2020

Here we present a series of five blog posts with tips and tricks about light sheet microscopy. 1. The basics of LSFM (Sept 2020) 2. Improving sample mounting (Oct 2020) 3. Calibration and Acquisition (Nov 2020) 4. Tailoring the data (Dec 2020) 5. What is next? AI and smarter than us LSFM (Jan 2021)

SRRF-Stream+ Super-Resolution Microscopy Accessible to All

Sponsored by Andor, on 12 August 2020

Fast, reliable & live-cell compatible Super-Resolution Science has limits imposed by the laws of physics that constrain discoveries and the advance of knowledge. In microscopy, up until the beginning of the XXI century, the diffraction limit of light was an unbreakable barrier. This law of physics imposes that two points could not be resolved (clearly

Science and Art – the not so odd couple?

Posted by , on 31 July 2020

At a first, superficial glance, you could be forgiven for placing scientists and artists at the opposite ends of the career spectrum. Scientists need to be accurate and methodical. They must generate highly reproducible data while adhering to strict regulations. On the other hand, artists are often stereotyped as disorganized, free spirits, ungoverned by rules,

Expansion microscopy

Posted by , on 29 July 2020

Written by Shoh Asano and Ruixuan Gao Light microscopy and diffraction limit For centuries, light microscopy has played a central role in biological studies. The first implementations of a light microscope dates back to as early as the late 16th and early 17th century, when an array of polished lenses was used to magnify (biological)

“openFrame” for modular, extensible, easily maintained, open-source microscopy

Posted by , on 23 July 2020

The openFrame [1] is an open-source microscopy hardware project initiated by the Photonics Group in the Physics Department at Imperial College London that is intended to provide access to a modular, upgradable, easily maintained and modifiable microscope frame that can be implemented at relatively low cost compared to existing commercial instruments. openFrame is a component

Electron microscopy: from the dark ages to a bright future

Posted by , on 21 July 2020

Good sample preparation is, as every microscopist knows, the key to delivering sound results from an imaging experiment. In the digital age, and with the advent of big data, image analysis is also critical to extract meaningful quantitative results from image data. Indeed nowadays, the microscope itself is often the most well-developed and user-friendly part

Etch A Cell - segmenting electron microscopy data with the power of the crowd

Posted by , on 16 July 2020

Recent years have seen remarkable developments in imaging techniques and technologies, producing increasingly rich datasets that require huge amounts of costly technological infrastructure, computational power and researcher effort to process. Techniques such as light-sheet microscopy and volume electron microscopy routinely generate terabytes worth of data overnight. With a single data acquisition producing more images than