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This false-coloured scanning electron micrograph of two Plasmodium ookinetes (purple) was submitted by Leandro Lemgruber Soares. Plasmodium is a parasitic protozoon that causes Malaria. This motile life form is a fertilised zygote that burrows into the wall of the mosquito midgut in order to develop into an oocyst. This represents one stage in the malaria parasite life cycle. Cellular debris (yellow) from the growth medium is also visible. 

Leandro has 20 years of experience working on microscopy, applying light and electron microscopy, super-resolution and cry-microscopy as well as correlative microscopy and image analysis. He has worked in Brazil, Italy, Germany, USA and, for the last 6 years. He established and manages the Glasgow Imaging Facility at the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation at the University of Glasgow.

Recent posts

British Society for Cell Biology competitions

Posted by , on 16 June 2021

Hello cell biologists, The BSCB has two looming deadlines for 1) our image competition, and 2) our science writing competition. Deadline for applications is June 30th 2021. Cash prizes awarded to winning entries. For competition details visit BSCB.org. Entries can be sent to Stephen.Robinson@quadram.ac.uk.

Turn Your Inverted Microscope into a Multimodal Nanoscope

Sponsored by Olympus, on 14 June 2021

Among recent nanoscopy techniques that break the diffraction limit, single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) contributes to major discoveries in medicine and biology. It is now possible to see how subcellular molecular machineries form and behave inside single cells and to quantify single biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids, at ultralow concentrations inside the

A First Exposure to Super-Resolution Microscopy

Posted by , on 11 June 2021

Biomedical research encompasses several fields of expertise involving complex biological topics and technologies. Studying a given subject is a process that takes years, decades, and sometimes a lifetime to complete. Consequently, researchers tend to become highly familiar with a specific subset of scientific topics and experimental approaches. However, they are often confronted with the cumbersome

News digest

Posted by , on 11 June 2021

Here is a selection of interesting news, publications and discussions related to microscopy that happened in the past two weeks. Thank you to our ‘FocalPlane reporters’: Martin Jones, Manish Kumar, Andrey Andreev and Parash Prasad who helped us create this list. Twitter Microscopes and imaging tools: REALM, adaptive optics for single-molecule localisation https://twitter.com/MarijnSiemons/… Excitation optics

Hot reads

Posted by , on 8 June 2021

Today we start a new monthly post. We have asked three researchers to propose their three favourite recently published papers (related to microscopy, of course). You might be up to date with the recent literature in your field of research, but what about other disciplines? We hope this list, provided this month by Claudia Almeida,

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Updated on 15 June 2021